世界の経済秩序に果たすロシアの役割は西側が考えていたより大きかった: ずくなしの冷や水

2022年06月03日

世界の経済秩序に果たすロシアの役割は西側が考えていたより大きかった

As sanctions fail and Russia advances, Western media changes its tune on Ukraine
Western media outlets, once cheerleaders for Kiev, are increasingly warning sanctions are failing and Ukraine needs to make peace
Even as the collective West continues to insist – against all observable reality – that the conflict in Ukraine is going well for Kiev, major media outlets are becoming increasingly uneasy with the situation on the economic front. More and more observers are admitting that the embargoes imposed by the US and its allies aren’t crushing the Russian economy, as originally intended, but rather their own.

Meanwhile, major publications have begun to report on the actual situation on the frontlines, rather than uncritically quoting myths like the ‘Ghost of Kiev’ or ‘Snake Island 13’ propagated by Volodymyr Zelensky’s office, as they did early on. There have even been hints, however timid, that the West should perhaps stop unconditionally supporting Kiev and promote a negotiated peace instead.

“Russia is winning the economic war,” the Guardian’s economics editor Larry Elliott declared on Thursday. “It is now three months since the west launched its economic war against Russia, and it is not going according to plan. On the contrary, things are going very badly indeed,” he wrote.

Elliott actually argues that the recent US announcement of sending rocket launchers to Ukraine is proof that sanctions are not working: “The hope is that modern military technology from the US will achieve what energy bans and the seizure of Russian assets have so far failed to do: force [Russian President Vladimir] Putin to withdraw his troops.”

In a May 30 essay, Guardian columnist Simon Jenkins also said that the embargo had failed to force a Russian withdrawal, but argued the EU should “stick to helping Ukraine’s war effort” instead, while withdrawing the sanctions because they are “self-defeating and senselessly cruel.”

As Jenkins points out, the sanctions have actually raised the price of Russian exports such as oil and grain – thus enriching, rather than impoverishing, Moscow while leaving Europeans short of gas and Africans running out of food.

Note that Jenkins is wrong about the supposed effectiveness of Western weapons, given that Russian and Donbass troops have won a series of victories over the past month – from Popasnaya to Liman. On May 26, the Washington Post of all places published a shockingly frank account of how one Ukrainian unit lost more than half its strength near Severodonetsk and retreated to the rear. Its commanders actually got arrested for treason after speaking to the US outlet.

This reality couldn’t be ignored by even the Telegraph’s defense editor, Con Coughlin, who’s become somewhat of a meme for prophesying Russian defeat on a weekly basis. He is now saying Moscow might pull off a “shock triumph” – albeit in service of his argument that Kiev needs even more weapons.

The collective West’s failure to break Russia was apparent even to The Economist, not exactly a publication sympathetic to Moscow. The newspaper reluctantly admitted a month ago that the Russian economy had bounced back from the initial sanctions shock. Meanwhile, it’s the West that has to deal with energy shortages, spiraling costs of living, and record inflation. It’s Americans, not Russians, who can’t find baby formula in stores and can’t afford gas.

Perhaps that’s why this “spring of discontent” with the Western sanctions policy hasn’t been confined to the European side of the Atlantic. On Tuesday, the New York Times ran an op-ed by Christopher Caldwell in which he criticized the Biden administration for “closing off avenues of negotiation and working to intensify the war” by sending more and more weapons to Kiev.

“The United States is trying to maintain the fiction that arming one’s allies is not the same thing as participating in combat,” Caldwell wrote, pointing out that this distinction is getting “more and more artificial” in the information age. A day later, the head of the US Cyber Command admitted to conducting offensive operations against Russia on Ukraine’s behalf.
欧米の集団が-観察可能なあらゆる現実に反して-ウクライナ紛争はキエフにとってうまくいっていると主張し続けているときでさえ、主要メディアは経済面での状況にますます不安を感じている。米国とその同盟国が課した禁輸措置が、当初の目的通りロシア経済を潰しているのではなく、むしろ自分たちの経済を潰していることを認める観測筋が増えている。

一方、大手出版社も、初期のようにヴォロディミル・ゼレンスキー事務所が喧伝する「キエフの亡霊」や「蛇の島13番地」といった神話を無批判に引用するのではなく、前線の実態を報道するようになった。西側諸国はキエフを無条件に支援するのをやめ、交渉による和平を推進すべきだというヒントも、臆病ながら出てきている。

「ロシアは経済戦争に勝っている」と、ガーディアン紙の経済担当編集者ラリー・エリオットは木曜日に宣言した。「西側がロシアに対して経済戦争を仕掛けてから3ヶ月が経つが、計画通りには進んでいない。それどころか、事態は実に悪くなっている」と書いている。

エリオットは実際に、最近アメリカがウクライナにロケットランチャーを送ることを発表したのは、制裁が効いていない証拠だと主張している。"エネルギー禁止やロシア資産の差し押さえがこれまでできなかったこと、つまりプーチン(ロシア大統領)に軍隊を撤退させることを、アメリカからの近代的な軍事技術で達成することが期待されている"。

ガーディアンのコラムニスト、サイモン・ジェンキンスも5月30日のエッセイで、禁輸措置はロシアを撤退させることに失敗したと述べ、代わりにEUは「ウクライナの戦争努力を助けることに専念」し、制裁は「自滅的で無意味に残酷」なので撤回すべきだと主張している。

ジェンキンス氏が指摘するように、制裁は実際に石油や穀物といったロシアの輸出品を値上げしている。そのため、モスクワは貧しくなるどころか豊かになり、一方でヨーロッパではガス欠、アフリカでは食料不足に陥っているのだ。

ロシアとドンバスの軍隊が、ポパスナヤからリマンまで、この一ヶ月の間に次々と勝利を収めていることを考えると、西側諸国の兵器の有効性に関してジェンキンスは間違っていることに注意されたい。5月26日付のワシントン・ポスト紙は、セベロドネツク付近でウクライナのある部隊が戦力の半分以上を失い、後方に退却したことを衝撃的に率直に伝えている。その指揮官は、米国の報道機関の取材に応じた後、国家反逆罪で逮捕された。

この現実は、テレグラフ紙の国防担当編集者であるコン・コフリンでさえ無視できなかった。彼は、毎週のようにロシアの敗北を予言することで、ある種のミームになっている。彼は今、モスクワが「衝撃的な勝利」を収めるかもしれないと語っている。キエフにはさらに多くの武器が必要だという彼の主張のためではあるのだが。

欧米の集団がロシアを破滅させることに失敗したことは、モスクワに同情的な出版社とは言えないThe Economistにさえ明らかであった。同紙は1カ月前、ロシア経済が最初の制裁ショックから立ち直ったことをしぶしぶ認めた。一方、エネルギー不足、生活費の高騰、記録的なインフレに対処しなければならないのは、西側諸国である。粉ミルクが店頭になく、ガソリンが買えないのはロシア人ではなくアメリカ人である。

欧米の制裁政策に対する「不満の春」が、大西洋のヨーロッパ側だけに留まらないのは、そのためかもしれない。火曜日、ニューヨークタイムズはクリストファー・コールドウェルの論説を掲載し、バイデン政権がキエフにどんどん武器を送ることで「交渉の道を閉ざし、戦争を激化させるように働いている」と批判している。

コールドウェル氏は、「米国は、同盟国を武装させることと戦闘に参加することは同じではないという虚構を維持しようとしている」と書き、この区別は情報化時代において「ますます人工的に」なってきていると指摘した。その1日後、米サイバー軍のトップが、ウクライナのためにロシアに対して攻撃的な作戦を実施したことを認めた。

Fyodor Lukyanov: Russia’s role in the global economic order has turned out to be more significant than the West believed
Western sanctions against Russia are speeding up the end of globalization as we’ve known it. A new economic order awaits.
After weeks of intensive negotiations, the European Union has agreed on a sixth package of sanctions against Moscow. Its main element is the cessation, by the end of this year, of oil imports from Russia delivered to the bloc’s market by sea.

According to President of the European Commission Ursula von der Leyen, this will reduce Russian supplies to the EU by 90%, with the remaining 10% lined up for the chop in the future.

The percentage share is a debatable issue, but the assessment of the head of the European Council, Charles Michel, who announced the ban on two-thirds of Russian raw materials, looks more realistic. For Russia, the main thing so far is not quantity, but quality. Pipeline routes, unlike maritime routes, cannot be redirected elsewhere; a ban would have meant decommissioning the Druzhba pipeline and losing this delivery method. This did not happen due to the persistence of Hungary, which was secretly supported by several other countries.

As for tankers, the global oil market is unified, and until a global trade embargo is imposed against Russia (which is almost impossible), goods will be sent to other consumers, mainly those in Asia.

At the same time, the price per barrel continued to rise after the announcement of the new measures. So Russia, in terms of revenues, will continue to benefit in the near term, at least.

Even considering the discounts that customers from Asia will receive, they are always sensitive to the narrowing of their partner’s room for alternatives. However, the timeframe for the full implementation of even Brussels’ already agreed upon solution is still unknown.

Industry experts have unanimously agreed that there is no substitute for Russian oil in the EU at the moment, as the volumes available on the market are limited. So it cannot be ruled out that after the loud political declarations have faded from the headlines, there will be a very cautious and gradual implementation. In any case, the most interesting aspect of this story is not the tactical, but the strategic aspect.

Let’s assume that the EU does set a clear political goal of ending energy cooperation with Russia, and in the medium-term it will be possible to implement it. What would this mean for the world order?

The fragmentation process, which is already taking place, has worsened, and, in recent months, it has taken on an avalanche-like character. If the EU’s slogans come to pass (and the phase-out of hydrocarbons, including gas, was pledged long before the Ukraine crisis), the energy structure of Eurasia could be completely transformed. Since the 1960s, the geopolitical configuration of the continent has been based on increasingly extensive oil and gas cooperation between the (now former) USSR and Western Europe.

China, which was unfriendly to the Soviet Union and distant in every sense from Europe, remained a thing in itself for some time, but from the 1970s it began to open up to the world, first politically, then economically, focusing primarily on the US. After the end of the Cold War, these processes became organic elements of the global order, with the expectation that a world-wide system of economic interdependence would eventually emerge. Now, in fact, the opposite will happen.

The EU intends to make a purposeful effort to rid itself of Russian raw materials, although economically this is totally impractical and mostly unprofitable. The replacement should be its own resources (preferably renewable technologies) and other sources, most likely the US and the Middle East. Let’s put aside, for the moment, the question of the reliability and cost-effectiveness of alternatives, assuming that in case of firm political resolve, EU states will be prepared to pay more and bear additional risks.

The surplus Russian resources will go to Asian markets – oil immediately, gas in a couple of years – when this country has the necessary infrastructure in place. The Asian countries are completely satisfied with this situation, because now they will hold the advantage that Europe has had so far: The presence of a very large, stable, and relatively cheap source of raw materials. In addition, there is an opportunity to seek more favorable conditions, compared to the general world situation, especially in the near future, while Russia adapts to changing circumstances. If the described scheme becomes a reality, the departure from globalization will proceed at a faster pace.

In recent months, it has become clear that Russia’s role in the global economic order is much greater than is commonly thought.

The resources of Eurasia, most of which are either located in Russia or depend on its transport and logistics capabilities, have become an important pillar of development for the world’s leading players since the end of the twentieth century. How skillfully and far-sightedly Moscow itself has managed this role is a different question.

Nevertheless, it will remain relevant even after a possible “divorce” from Europe and “marriage” to Asia. However, a change in the political balance in Eurasia will affect the entire world order, and not in favor of those who were its chief beneficiaries until recently. In this regard, it will be most interesting to see if Western leaders will continue to encourage the process, or whether a possible political shift in the near future will lead to the emergence of forces who look at things from a different perspective.



数週間に及ぶ集中的な交渉の末、欧州連合(EU)はモスクワに対する第6次制裁措置に合意した。その主な内容は、ロシアからEUの市場に海上輸送される石油の輸入を年内に停止することである。

欧州委員会のウルスラ・フォン・デア・ライエン委員長によると、これによってロシアからEUへの供給は90%減少し、残りの10%は将来的に削減される予定であるという。

この割合には議論の余地があるが、ロシアの原材料の3分の2を禁止すると発表したシャルル・ミシェル欧州理事会議長の評価の方がより現実的であるように見える。ロシアにとって、これまでのところメインは量ではなく質である。パイプラインは海路と違い、他に転用できない。禁止すれば、ドルジバパイプラインが廃止され、この配送手段を失うことになる。それが実現しなかったのは、ハンガリーの粘り強さと、他の数カ国の密かな支援によるものだ。

タンカーについては、世界の石油市場は統一されており、ロシアに対する世界的な貿易禁止令が出るまでは(それはほとんど不可能)、他の消費者、主にアジアに送られることになる。

同時に、新措置の発表後も1バレルあたりの価格は上昇を続けている。つまり、ロシアは、収入面では、少なくとも当面はその恩恵を受け続けることになる。

アジアからの顧客が受ける割引を考えても、彼らは常に相手の代案の余地が狭まることに敏感である。しかし、すでに合意しているブリュッセルのソリューションでさえ、完全実施の時間枠はまだ不明である。

業界の専門家の間では、市場に出回る量が限られているため、現時点ではEU域内でロシアの石油に代わるものはないというのが一致した意見である。したがって、派手な政治的宣言が見出しから消えた後、非常に慎重かつ段階的な実施が行われる可能性は否定できない。いずれにせよ、この話の最も興味深い点は、戦術的な面ではなく、戦略的な面である。

仮に、EUがロシアとのエネルギー協力の終了という明確な政治目標を掲げ、中期的にはそれを実行に移すことが可能になるとしよう。それは世界秩序にとってどのような意味を持つのだろうか。

すでに起こっている分断のプロセスは悪化し、ここ数ヶ月、雪崩のような性格を帯びてきている。EUのスローガンが実現すれば(ガスを含む炭化水素の段階的撤退はウクライナ危機のずっと前に公約されていた)、ユーラシア大陸のエネルギー構造は完全に変容する可能性がある。1960年代以降、大陸の地政学的な構成は、(現在の旧)ソ連と西ヨーロッパの間でますます広範な石油・ガス協力に基づくものとなっている。

ソ連に非対称で、あらゆる意味でヨーロッパから遠い存在であった中国は、しばらくはそれ自体であり続けたが、1970年代から、まず政治的に、次に経済的に、主にアメリカを中心に世界に対して開かれていく。冷戦終結後、これらのプロセスは世界秩序の有機的な要素となり、やがて世界的な経済的相互依存のシステムが出現すると期待された。しかし、今は、その逆が起こっている。

EUは、ロシアの原材料を排除するために意図的に努力しているが、経済的には全く非現実的であり、ほとんど採算が合わない。その代わりとして、自国の資源(できれば再生可能技術)と他の供給源(おそらく米国と中東)を利用する。代替品の信頼性や費用対効果の問題はひとまず置いておくとして、政治的決断が固まった場合、EU諸国はより多くの費用を支払い、さらなるリスクを負担する覚悟があると仮定する。

ロシアの余剰資源は、この国に必要なインフラが整えば、石油は直ちに、ガスは数年後に、アジア市場へ供給されることになる。アジア諸国はこの状況に完全に満足している。なぜなら、これまでヨーロッパが持っていた優位性を、今度は自分たちが持つことになるからだ。なぜなら、ヨーロッパがこれまで持っていた、大規模で安定した、しかも比較的安価な原材料の供給源を手に入れることができるからだ。さらに、ロシアが状況の変化に適応している間、特に近い将来、世界の一般的な状況と比較して、より有利な条件を求める機会がある。このような構想が現実のものとなれば、グローバル化からの離脱はより速いペースで進むことになる。

ここ数カ月、世界経済秩序におけるロシアの役割は、一般に考えられているよりもはるかに大きいことが明らかになってきた。

ユーラシア大陸の資源は、そのほとんどがロシアに存在するか、あるいはロシアの輸送・物流能力に依存しており、20世紀末以降、世界の主要プレーヤーにとって重要な発展の柱となったのである。モスクワ自身がこの役割をいかに巧みに、また先見性を持ってマネージしてきたかは別問題である。

しかし、ヨーロッパとの「離婚」、アジアとの「結婚」の可能性がある後も、この役割は重要であり続けるだろう。しかし、ユーラシア大陸の政治的バランスの変化は、世界秩序全体に影響を及ぼすものであり、最近までその恩恵に浴していた人々に有利なものではありません。この点で、欧米の指導者がこのプロセスを後押しし続けるのか、あるいは近い将来起こりうる政治的変化によって、異なる視点から物事を見る勢力が出現するのか、最も興味深いところである。
posted by ZUKUNASHI at 12:14| Comment(0) | ウクライナ
この記事へのコメント
コメントを書く
お名前: [必須入力]

メールアドレス: [必須入力]

ホームページアドレス:

コメント: [必須入力]

※ブログオーナーが承認したコメントのみ表示されます。